Intermediate Text — Kicking Disadvantages

“Kicking” a Disadvantage
Sometimes during a debate you will want to “kick” – not go for – one of your disadvantages.  To do this, you need to effectively “kick” it.

It is very important that your properly kick a disadvantage.  If you do not, the affirmative team may easily extend a turn.

For example, imagine that you present that initial spending disadvantage that I have been discussing and that the affirmative responds with the following five arguments:

1. No link – we don’t spend money

2. Turn – we save money

3. Non-unique – the government will spend more money in the future . . .

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